Anjali Mudra for Balance

Some of you may be familiar with Anjali Mudra (palms together in
front of your chest) as prayer pose or Namaste pose. Anjali mudra
is a powerful gesture of wholeness, peace and respect.
This mudra is found in the practice of many religions and
represents devotion to a Higher Power, deep listening within,
behaving with sincerity & respect.
On a physical level, Anjali mudra unites the left and right sides
of the brain and body. … Continue reading >Anjali Mudra for Balance

Balance Yoga Mudras – Anjali Mudra
‘I salute the divinity in you’
Mudras are a set of subtle physical movements or positions
that can change one’s mood, attitude, or perspective, and
which help increase concentration and alertness.
A mudra can be a simple hand position or it can encompass the
entire body. Mudra means “seal” or “closure” in Sanskrit. The
science of Mudras, a part of Yoga is based on the fundamental
principles of life, namely the five Elements: the five Pranas and the
three Doshas (more on Sui
We use these gestures often in meditation but also in asana and
breathing practice to direct the flow of energy within the body by
using the hands. Our fingers have more nerve endings than any
other body part. They are ‘sense-’ itive and our prana/energy
channels (nadis) are generally considered to correspond with our
physical nerves. When we place our hands in yoga mudras, we
stimulate different areas of the brain and create a specific energy
circuit in the body.
Some of you may be familiar with Anjali Mudra (palms together in
front of your chest) as prayer pose or Namaste pose. Anjali mudra
is a powerful gesture of wholeness, peace and respect.
This mudra is found in the practice of many religions and
represents devotion to a Higher Power, deep listening within,
behaving with sincerity & respect.
On a physical level, Anjali mudra unites the left and right sides
of the brain and body.
The many nerve endings/nadis in your right hand activate the left
side of the brain which is linked to analytical skills, and your left
hand stimulates the right hemisphere of the brain which is the
creative & intuitive side of your brain. ‘When you touch your hands
together both sides of the brain are stimulated simultaneously,
which is said to integrate the brain to function as a whole and
enhance our concentration and assimilation.’
(Vrndavan Dasi).
The mind experiences positive thoughts, your breath slows and
calms & opportunities for intuition arise. Anjali is a deeply balancing
Mudra.
How do we perform this mudra?
Every Surya Namaskar starts with the practitioner bringing their
hands in Anjali Mudra. However, there are ways to practice this
mudra for most benefit
First, sit in a comfortable position. You can sit on a chair,
cushion, or in a sukhasana (easy cross legged pose). Keep
your spine relaxed and lengthened. You can even tuck your
slightly chin in to lengthen back of neck.
Then, slowly bring your hands together in front of your heart
chakra, the Anahata chakra. When you do this, your
awareness is being directed to your heart, letting energy flow
from other points of your body to the heart center.
When correctly performed, your palms are not completely
flat; allow space between the knuckles at the base of your
fingers. This will also allow space between all knuckles.
Fingertips are connected as are heels of you hands and outer
edges of your thumbs and palms. This allows less tension in
your hands and shoulders and a more open gesture to the
Divine within us.
It is not necessary to close your eyes. If you do so, you can be
even more aware of the energy flowing to the center of your
chest.
Relax after taking a few deep breaths and relax your hands to
your lap.
Every time you bring your hands together, feel the two
different aspects of your energy coming together in balance
and harmony.
You can also use this posture to bring more energy to your
heart. Touch the thumbs to the sternum of your chest lightly.
Arch your shoulder blades a little to open up the chest more.
The elbows can be in line with your fingers. This change will
take a little effort but the experience of balance would be
greatly heightened. If holding for extended time, elbows may
relax; let your body guide you.
When do we perform Anjali Mudra ?
In our yoga classes, we often embrace this mudra at the end of a
class as a humble thanks and way of recognising our teacher and
classmates & the light within ourselves and each of us. We centre
our mind and body.
Anjali mudra is also adopted in Mountain Pose and at the
beginning/end of Sun Salutations but it may also be of assistance
in standing Balancing poses like Tree Pose, pyramid pose, lunging
twists and Yogi Squats (Malasana). When used in variations of
Anjaneyasana (high lunge) and Warrior Poses, this mudra can add
to the grounding, calming effect of these strong balance poses. In
any yoga pose this mudra may gently remind us of our inward
Balance & journey, as well as the spiritual purpose of our lives.
The mudra can be practised during class, home practise, prayer
and simply anytime to bring you back to Balance.
How long to hold the Mudra? From 30 seconds to 30 minutes, as
works with your intention and practise. Notice sensations, calmness,
intuitions, improvements in concentration and memory and
feelings of Balance. We are offering to the Divine, to the Divine
within others and to the Divine within ourselves.
Namaste, Sarah
Thanks to Art of Living.org for material used to dot-point how to
perform the mudra

2 Replies to “Anjali Mudra for Balance”

    1. Thank you Arun, I love the balancing and reverential aspects of Anjali Mudra. It brings me to Peace and draws me inward, though each person may experience it differently according to their intention and lens.
      Let me know how you find the practice yourself 🙏

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