Patanjali’s Yamas: ways of living with Grace

The Yamas are the first limb of Patanjali’s Yoga Sutras and often considered the foundation of Yoga practise. And living an authentic life. The 5 Yamas serve as guiding principles for ethical conduct and self-discipline, providing a framework for leading a more conscious and compassionate life both on and off the Yoga mat. By incorporating these principles into their practice, Yogis aim to cultivate a deeper sense of inner peace, harmony, and connection with themselves and the world around them. … Continue reading >Patanjali’s Yamas: ways of living with Grace

The Yamas are the first limb of Patanjali’s Yoga Sutras and often considered the foundation of Yoga practise. And living an authentic life. The 5 Yamas serve as guiding principles for ethical conduct and self-discipline, providing a framework for leading a more conscious and compassionate life both on and off the Yoga mat. By incorporating these principles into their practice, Yogis aim to cultivate a deeper sense of inner peace, harmony, and connection with themselves and the world around them.
Centenary Yoga: Grace in Yoga, Grace in life
A
Ahimsa
The first Yama is ‘Ahimsa’, “Do no Harm” as in the Hippocratic Oath.How can we do no (or less) harm in our language? Our actions? Our thoughts about ourselves?
Softening our environmental footprint? Not forcing our bodies on our mats? Or overloading our
schedules? (yep, that can be us!)


Satya
Can we find liberation by being really authentic in all our dealings with others and ourself! The second Yama, ‘Satya’ which means “truth” or “truthfulness. Speak and be our truth with kindness and awareness.“Satya” shall make you free. Namaste!
Centenaray Yoga chair warriors


Asteya
The third Yama is ‘Asteya’ translated simply as “non-stealing”.We don’t steal stuff! So can we broaden Asteya to not taking anything which is not freely given? Others’ time? Do we ever take more than we need? Consider Asteya in your life today. Embrace a life guided by integrity.



Brahmacharya
Our fourth Yama is ‘Brahmacharya’ was
originally for monastic life, historically translated as “celibacy”. Modern meaning considers how we might be wasting energy on habits or priorities which no longer serve, and living simply, without excess. Enough is a feast!Let moderation be your guide. 
Centenary Yoga bound extended side angle pose

Aparigraha
The fifth Yama, “Aparigraha” meaning ‘non-greed’ or releasing attachment. Aparigraha implies the practice of non-attachment or non-possession. We all love beautiful things in life, yet consider what you might be without them. By adapting and adopting simple lifestyles and practicing sustainable living we may find real inner fulfillment and lighntess, beyond and beneath the clutter of things.
Centenary Yoga Yamas

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *